Jack the Giant Slayer (2013)

22 March 2013

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Jack the Giant Slayer. An ancient war is reignited when a young farmhand unwittingly opens a gateway between our world and a fearsome race of giants. Unleashed on the Earth for the first time in centuries, the giants strive to reclaim the land they once lost, forcing the young man, Jack (Nicholas Hoult), into the battle of his life to stop them. Fighting for a kingdom and its people, and the love of a brave princess, he comes face to face with the unstoppable warriors he thought only existed in legend… and gets the chance to become a legend himself.

Acclaimed filmmaker Bryan Singer directs the 3D epic action adventure “Jack the Giant Slayer,” starring Nicholas Hoult (“X-Men: First Class”) in the title role. The film also stars Eleanor Tomlinson as Princess Isabelle; Stanley Tucci (“Captain America: The First Avenger”) as the deceitful Lord Roderick; Ian McShane (“Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides,” HBO’s “Deadwood”) as the besieged King Brahmwell; Bill Nighy (“Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows”) as the giants’ leader, General Fallon; and Ewan McGregor (“Star Wars,” “The Ghost Writer”) as palace guard Elmont.

Singer directs from a screenplay by Christopher McQuarrie and Dan Studney, story by Darren Lemke & David Dobkin. The film is produced by Neal Moritz, David Dobkin, Bryan Singer and Patrick McCormick with Thomas Tull, Jon Jashni, Alex Garcia, and Ori Marmur serving as executive producers. John Rickard co-produces.?The creative filmmaking team includes Singer’s longtime collaborators, director of photography Newton Thomas Sigel (“X-Men,” “Superman Returns”) and editor John Ottman (“X2,” “Superman Returns”). The production designer is Gavin Bocquet (“Star Wars: Episode III – Revenge of the Sith”).

A New Line Cinema presentation, in association with Legendary Pictures, “Jack the Giant Slayer” will be distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures, a Warner Bros. Entertainment Company.

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"Jack and the Beanstalk on the big screen with tremendous freshness and grace"

Following the recent trend of bringing beloved fairytales to the big screen, Bryan Singer has brought the classic Jack and the Beanstalk fable to life, with tremendous freshness and grace.

The film opens with a young Jack being told a bedtime story by his father at the same time the young Princess Isabelle is being told the same story by her mother which sets up the mythology that the film is based on, fast forward ten years and Jack (Nicholas Hoult) is a farm hand working with his elderly uncle, who sets him the task of taking their horse (not a cow) to market to sell since they are struggling financially. After an altercation with some local rogues, defending the honour of Princess Isabelle (Eleanor Tomlinson), Jack swaps the horse for the fabled magic beans with a fugitive Monk. 

His uncle is not best pleased with what Jack returns home with and sets out with some items that belonged to Jack's long dead father to get some money. After Jack's uncle leaves during the terrible storm, Jack gives shelter to a traveller who turns out to be the Princess from the market. As Jack and Isabelle talk, one of the magic beans gets wet and grows into a beanstalk trapping Isabelle in what was Jack's house. Jack falls to the ground and a rescue mission for Isabelle is mounted led by Elmont (Ewan McGregor) and Eddie Marsan's Crawe. Roderick (Stanley Tucci) and his right hand man Wicke (Ewen Bremner) go along on the quest, and Roderick's true intentions soon come to fruition once they reach the top and encounter the giants.

Bill Nighy voices General Fallon, the leader of the giants, and is rather impressive as the menacing giant, complete with a second small head too which is rather amusing. Hoult and Tomlinson also have a great chemistry together, which really helps the story along without force feeding us a forbidden love side plot to distract from the story which although somewhat conventional, works terrifically well in this instance. 

The film culminates in a very impressive battle between the humans and the giants, and ends in a very intelligent manner, making for a fine return for Singer, more than whetting the appetite ahead of X-Men Days of Future Past next year. 

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